AMD to release Kaveri APUs in January 2014

Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) has initiated the first shipments of its long-awaited Kaveri APUs to partners – a move that has shed some more light on the fate of these accelerated processing units (APUs). What’s more important is that now there’s more information regarding AMD’s plans and the Kaveri product.

The first shipments have made it possible to publish the first photos of the Kaveri APUs and they show a product that very much looks like the current AMD APUs. Although this is still an engineering sample the Kaveri APUs in the photos are made on 28 nm technology and are diffused in Germany and assembled in Malaysia. The unofficial launch date has also been set and it is January 7, 2014.

The AMD Kaveri APUs should have four Steamroller x86 cores and AMD Radeon HD graphics as well as some architectural enhancements such as heterogeneous uniform memory access, CPU and GPU cache coherency and others. Unfortunately for some users Kaveri will only be compatible with the FM2+ form factor.

(images courtesy of VR-Zone)


Source: X-bit Labs

Related posts

Intel details Skylake’s microarchitecture

Intel details Skylake’s microarchitecture

At the on-going Intel Developer Forum (IDF) 2015 Intel has finally detailed the Skylake CPU microarchitecture, full two weeks after the first two flagships of the new CPU family were launched – the Core i5-6600K and Core i7-6700K. Despite the minor performance gains that Skylake exhibits, the...

Migration from Windows XP to Windows 10 might be cheap

Migration from Windows XP to Windows 10 might be cheap

After the Windows 8 debacle Microsoft will soon try to get everyone on Windows 10 via aggressive pricing and free updates. We know that users of genuine copies of Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 will be able to update their operating systems to Windows 10 for free within one year after the new OS...

Corsair expands Force LS SSD line

Corsair expands Force LS SSD line

About 2 years ago Corsair released the then new Force LS line of solid-state drives. The unusual fact about these drives back then was that they incorporated a memory controller by Phison instead of the almighty SandForce. The main goal was to cut manufacturing costs and offer a competitive SSD...

Leave a comment