Corsair releases budget-oriented power supply units

Corsair-VS650


The recent release of the higher end Corsair CX power supply units has prompted Corsair to release several budget-oriented offerings that all belong to the VS series.

All in all Corsair has released four VS models – the VS350, VS450, VS550 and VS650 – which boast 350W, 450W, 550W and 650W of power. The budget origin of the new PSUs is obvious – they lack 80 Plus certification as well as compatibility with the 110V electric power grid found in Japan and the US – which means that you simply can’t use these power supplies there. On the other hand they all sport ATX form factor and have overloading protection.

In addition only one line forms 12V of power required by modern computers. The two least powerful models have a single cable for powering 3D graphics cards (6+2 pins), while the two more powerful models offer two.

As a whole the new Corsair VS series is a good choice for less powerful and expensive PCs – and users can see this fact in the pricing too – the VS350, VS450, VS550 and VS650 models cost USD 40, USD 50, USD 60 and USD 70 respectively.


Source: Corsair

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