Philips releases smart displays

Philips releases smart displays

The Dutch tech company Philips has pleased European fans with the release of two new smart displays that run Android and come with pretty interesting hardware inside.

The two models are known as Philips S221C4AFD and Philips S231C4AFD. Both devices feature sensor displays, Full HD resolution (1920 x 1080 pixels), 178-degree viewing angles, 60 Hz refresh rate, 250 cd/m2 of brightness and support for up to 16.7 million colors. The first model comes with a 21.5-inch ADS display while the second one offers a 23-inch display on IPS technology.

Both models come with an NVIDIA Tegra T33 processor inside that runs at 1.6 GHz, 2 GB of DDR3 memory, 8 GB of internal memory, a SDHC memory card slot, 802.11n Wi-Fi, HDMI-MHL and D-Sub/VGA outputs, two USB 2.0 ports, a 1 MP web camera, 3.5-inch audio jacks and a microphone. The monitors can be tilted between 12-54 degrees and meet all RoHS requirements.

The new Philips displays run Android 4.2 Jelly Bean and cost EUR 359 for the 21.5-inch model and EUR 389 for the 23-inch display.

Source: Philips

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