Samsung produces DDR3 memory on 20 nm technology

Samsung produces DDR3 memory on 20 nm technology

Besides making smartphones of all kinds, Samsung is also a major DRAM manufacturer. This fact was just highlighted once again with the Korean company announcing that the mass production of the first DDR3 memory made using 20 nm technology has started. Until this moment DDR3 memory was made on 25 nm tech process.

To make it possible for DDR3 memory to operate properly Samsung was forced to use a new manufacturing technology. As we all know memory consists of cells with each cell having a capacitor and a transistor. The problem with this arrangement is that it scales harder than say NAND Flash memory so Samsung was forced to use modified double patterning and atomic layer deposition.

The final result is memory with improved density that now reaches 4 gigabits. In addition the new memory consumes 25 per cent less energy than memory built on 25 nm tech process. The thinner process will also allow Samsung to increase production by 30 per cent when compared to memory on 25 nm and more than twice when compared to 30 nm memory.

Source: Samsung

Related posts

MSI adds Wind Top AP2000 profsesional All-in-One PC

Yesterday MSI has announced a new Classic series All-in-One PC  and introduced the first model Wind Top AC1900, today they unveil another one new model, designed specifically for the business and office environment, as well for restaurants, hotel reception desks, 24-hour stores and gas stations...

Nokia Launches 3710 fold

Nokia today unveiled a mobile device that balances eye-catching design with the latest in mobile functionality. The compact Nokia 3710 fold adds a personal touch with an artistic pattern on the cover. Its diverse features are effortless to find and use. "There is a solid demand for...

Nokia Research Center unveils mobile radar concept

Nokia Research Center (NRC) Helsinki today unveiled a new research concept -the mobile radar. Demonstration at Demo House 2010 research exhibition in Espoo, Finland shows how a mobile device can use an active radar sensor to measure speed and the direction of movement of approaching objects...

Leave a comment