Apple Watch has a problem

Apple Watch has a problem

One of Apple’s latest and most promising products – the Apple Watch smartwatch – seems to have a serious problem – the taptic engine installed in the device is prone to failure, making the entire device an unusable piece of junk.

The problem has been found only recently after some internal testing showed the taptic engine almost always failed after some usage. What’s even worse is that Apple Watch has been in production so Apple now has a significant number of faulty Apple Watch smartwatches some of which have already been sold. The issue will force Apple to look for a solution which will further aggravate the supply issues Apple Watch has been experiencing. Still Apple hopes to introduce a fixed Apple Watch in significant numbers in June of this year.

The taptic engine in the Apple Watch is responsible for producing the sensation of being tapped on the wrist as a less intrusive way of notifying the user. The engine uses a motor to move a small rod back and forth, which creates the feeling of tapping. The Taptic Engine also plays a role in sending your heartbeat to other Apple Watch users.

Source: 9to5mac.com

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