Panasonic annonced LUMIX GF2 Micro Four Thirds camera

Panasonic today announced their smallest and lightest digital interchangeable lens system camera with a built-in flash – the LUMIX DMC-GF2.

The LUMIX GF2 is 19-percent smaller and approximately 7% lighter than the LUMIX GF1. It has an aluminum body, available in black, silver, white, and red, packs a 12.1-megapixel Live MOS sensor, which Panasonic claims to offer the best of both worlds – the superb image quality of a CCD sensor, plus the lower power consumption of a CMOS sensor.

Panasonic LUMIX-GF2

The compact camera feature Venus Engine FHD image processor, Intelligent Resolution technology, 23-area focusing system, Intelligent Auto mode, Dust Reduction System and an Optical Image Stabilizer, Face Detection, Intelligent D-range Control, and Intelligent Scene Selector. It also packs in the back a a 3-inch (460k dot) touchscreen backed by a newly- designed Touch Q user interface and AF tracking function. The can record 1920 x 1080 videos at 60i or 1280 x 720 movies at 60p in AVCHD with stereo sound and is also compatible with Panasonic’s new 3D interchangeable lens, the LUMIX G 12.5mm / F12, so users can take 3D photos.


The LUMIX GF2 will be available in January, but no info about price.

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