NVIDIA ceases Direct3D 10 support

NVIDIA ceases Direct3D 10 support

An official press release by NVIDIA, published on the company’s web site, has announced that support for Direct3D 10 (DirectX 10) has ended with all drivers provided being considered obsolete. Starting now NVIDIA will only support chips and graphics cards based on the Fermi, Kepler and Maxwell architectures.

The last driver to support Direct3D 10 cards will be under the 340 version number. NVIDIA will keep on fixing bugs in this one until April 1, 2016. A similar story occurred a few years ago when the company retired the Direct3D 9 generation in October 2012 but kept on supporting it until February 2013. AMD retired DirectX 10 products in April 2012 when the company moved the Radeon HD 2000, 3000 and 4000 generations in the obsolete product list.

DirectX 12 is expected any time soon but the first cards to fully support the new API will come out in 2015.

Source: NVIDIA

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